Sharing w/ You Excerpts on my ART

Just sharing . . .

Glenn's CyberArtPages

.

The Uncommon Art of Glenn Bautista

by Alice G. Guillermo

.

.

.

.

Glenn’s Early Sketches

.

.

970596_10151493917677732_1999204096_n

.

.

Remnants of Glenn’s
First 2-Month Tour of Europe
when he was a Student

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Having reach a high level of artistic development, the artist visited Germany in the early Eighties and specialized in lithography at the Kunstakademie in Dusseldorf. In the stimulating climate of the school, he enthusiastically plunged famed Bauhaus traditions. Thus, during this sojourn in that country, Glenn Bautista produced a series of art works for which he won critical recognition, his works becoming part of the permanent exhibit at GalerieArt204 at Rethelstrasse, Dusseldorf, in the distinguished company of Joseph Beuys and the Masters Ernst, Chagall, Dali, and Miro. He returned to the Philippines in the mid-eighties to resume his active participation in the art scene by working on…

View original post 1,342 more words

TXSBN Press Releases 2013 / Visual Artist – Glenn A. Bautista

TXSBN Press Releases 2013 / Visual Artist - Glenn A. Bautista

‘Uncommon Art’ Of Houston-Based Filipino Artist Glenn Bautista Reaches Texas Art Scene

HOUSTON, TEXAS, UNITED STATES, August 29, 2013 /Texas State Business Network/ — Prolific and extraordinary visual artist Glenn Bautista has been selected to join the exclusive ranks of Texas State Business Network as a result of his exceptional performance in the field of visual arts. Glenn has routinely exhibited the commitment, vision, and skills required to be considered among the best.

Since moving to Texas in 2009, Glenn Bautista has created over a hundred soft pastel drawings that capture, in a way that only his unique imagination can, the landscapes and life forms of the state’s suburbs and cities—Garland, Weatherford, Pearland and Houston. Published in three art books, these drawings, including those made in Colorado and California, attest to his relentless pursuit of art wherever he may be.

From his home in Houston, Glenn Bautista runs his own art gallery in the Philippines, Glenn’Studio, home to over 300 pieces of his personal artwork collection from 1963-2008. Established in 1990 as a personal project in architectural design, Glenn’Studio has served as a multidimensional expression of Glenn Bautista’s creative philosophy.

Glenn’s art—notably described by renowned art critic Alice Guillermo as “uncommon”—encompasses religious paintings in oil, sketches, portraits, lithographs and etchings, nude pastels, pencil pastel drawings, collages, soft pastel compositions, nature and technology compositions, golfscapes, zenscapes, abstractions in oil, Christian art, digital art, and heaven and earth oils. He currently sells his recent artworks and also accepts works on commission.

Throughout his career as an artist, Glenn Bautista has exhibited his works in various galleries and museums in the United States, Europe and Asia, including the Cultural Center of the Philippines; National Museum of Singapore; Galerie Art 204 in Düsseldorf, Germany; Brooks Institute of Fine Arts Gallery and the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, both in California; and the Firehouse Gallery & Art Center of the Weatherford Art Association in Texas.

Around Texas, Glenn is often invited to give a talk about art while his works are on exhibit. These ‘Art Talk/Exhibits’ have been held at the Parker Williams Library, Southpoint Club House, and the Houston Trinity United Methodist Church where he was also guest speaker for the Easter Sunrise Service. Recently, Glenn has also been invited to talk about his miraculous healing from Stage IV colon cancer at the Covina Community Church in California.

Despite acquiring a vast part of his expertise through professional experience, Glenn Bautista also built a solid academic foundation that includes his Certificate of Fine Arts from the University of the Philippines and Bachelor’s Degree of Fine Arts from the Brooks Institute of Fine Arts in California. He additionally studied lithography under Professor Rolf Sackenheim at the Staatliche Kunstakademie in Düsseldorf, Germany.

More information on Glenn Bautista as well as a complete catalogue of his personal art collection may be viewed at his website, http://www.glennbautista.com. He also sells originals and prints of his artworks through http://glenn-studio.artistwebsites.com, which includes his ongoing project, Digi-ana Pastel Portraits. Glenn continues to stay open to any other creative possibilities in relation to his artworks.

Jasmine Reid
Public Relations
State Business Network
700 12th Street N.W., Ste 700
Washington, DC 20005

– – – –

TXSBN Press Releases 2013 / Visual Artist – Glenn A. Bautista:

‘Uncommon Art’ Of Houston-Based Filipino Artist Glenn Bautista Reaches Texas Art Scene / Jasmine Reid – State Business Network Public Relations – 700 12th Street N.W., Ste 700 Washington, DC 20005

TXSBN net releases comp

ibwire.net:
http://www.ibwire.net/glenn-bautista-art-state-business-network/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=glenn-bautista-art-state-business-network

txsbn net link pressrelease comp2

beforeitsnews.com:
http://beforeitsnews.com/press-releases/2013/09/glenn-bautista-art-state-business-network-2794580.html

txsbn net link pressrelease comp3

watchlistnews.com:
http://www.watchlistnews.com/2013/09/03/glenn-bautista-art-state-business-network/
— at 700 12th Street N.W., Ste 700 Washington, DC 20005.

My UP (Peyups) Days / 1964-69 & Kunstakademie/Guest Student / 1980-85

. . gab by david-enhanced

.

.

(Excerpts from)

The Uncommon Art of Glenn

by Alice G. Guillermo

*

Associate Justice Jorge C. Bocobo

Another important portrait of the period is that of Associate Justice Jorge C. Bocobo, commissioned by his son, Israel. Instead of doing a formal portrait, the artist superimposed symbols in circular and prismatic forms, on the face of the subject. Nonetheless, it achieves a striking likeness and the work itself was used as model for a commemorative stamp.

.

 

bocobo-mural-up-law.jpg

.

Associate Justice Jorge Bocobo / Mural (9′ ft.x 14′ ft.) by Glenn Bautista

.

Glenn Bautista  also did a few landscapes in this period, one of which, entitled Carillon, alluding to the familiar feature of the university campus, foreshadowed his later concern with space. Almost abstract, the painting is minimal it its elements; its strong linear perspective serves to set off the large sweep of road, a modulating light blue against the burnt sienna of the surroundings, the structures of the buildings cropped and barely suggested. It is a work which bears affinities with the urban landscapes of Lyonel Feininger with their emphatic direction lines, structural aspect, and minimal detail.

.

carillon-smol.jpg

.
The UP Carillon & Abueva Gate Sculpture
(24″ x 36″ inches) University of the Philippine
Oil painting by Glenn A. Bautista

.

.

Joya n gb sketch-sml


Thanks RodS & Dan-dan for these two images of Ninong “Peping” Joya and my quick sketch I did in his drawing class. I merely visited the UPCFA in Diliman, QC when I met Ninong “Peping” on the fourth floor and he invited me to sketch in his drawing class. He gave me a sketch pad and a charcoal pencil to participate with his students. After I sketched, he got my sketch and talked about it to the class, having a deep understanding as to what made me do a skeletal and partially flesh drawing of the nude model. He said that only if one understands the human body can one come up with such an interpretative sketch . . . Ninong “Peping” gave time to be with people to encourage them to be creative, especially with me. We miss you, Ninong “Peping”. (at University of the Philippines, Gonzales Hall, Diliman, Quezon City, Philippines)
• Glenn A. Bautista: Here’re are some comments from Dan-dan’s previous posting of my sketch with Prof. Jose Joya.
• Glenn A. Bautista: Yes, Dan-dan, I remember this sketch . . . my godfather, National artist, Jose “Peping” Joya invited me to join his drawing class when I visited the UP College of Fine Arts. I remember him telling something to his class about this sketch. Can you take a better photo using daylight w/o the glare so I can include this to my art site? How did this sketch get to your mom? Can you ask her? Now, can you guess what the drawing is about? This is a rare drawing in a rare setting. Thanks for letting me know. Meron pa bang iba? Can you take good photos for my site? I know you have a few more pastels. Just angle the framed pastels so you don’t get the glare, and background it against a dark background so as not to have a reflection or mirror image. Thanks a lot .
• Dan Bautista: I didn’t ask how she got it. I’ll try to take a better pic next time uncle. I left the house na po kasi. Just wanted to share it, i bet it gives you a lot of good memories. June 29, 2012 at 7:53pm via mobile
• Glenn A. Bautista: Hi Bitoy, tennis ka pa? Musta sa pamilya. Lungkot dto sa tate. Lapit na kaming magbakasyon. June 29, 2012 at 9:31pm
• Enrique S. Bontia: Hi Glen this is Ike Bontia, i’m here in Dallas ‘san ka sa Tx? If you are in the vicinity let’s have coffee. June 30, 2012 at 5:13pm
• Glenn A. Bautista: Hi Ike, we are 270 miles apart, medyo long drive na rin . . . call me if you can: 469-964-8328 – July 1, 2012 at 9:40pm
• Rizalinda Bautista: Hi Glenn! this sketch has been with me for a long-long time. I think i salvaged it from a heap of things for trash when we were together in BF Homes. It’s crumpled and torn on its sides but I managed to fix it a little bit. I think I also have a sketch u made of Dondon as a very little boy playing near you while you were sketching-painting. This one didn’t have your signature tho but am sure it was around late 1979 to early 1980 when you sketched it. I will ask Dandan to take a pic of it to be sent to you one of these days. -June 27 at 8:56pm –
• Alfredo Roces: Glenn, I recognize tha back of Abe Cruz and beside Baby is Tony Quintos. Both Tony and Abe have left us. God bless, – Ding.
• Alfredo Roces: keep on writing about your times Glenn.
• Glenn A. Bautista: Yes, DingR, I have been digging up images from my hard disks and photos sent in to me by David, many of which I had not seen. Just organizing these images is not an easy task. But having the present digital tools right in front of me, I should not really be complaining. Now, I seem to understand why you love to write, a skill I have totally neglected. Thanks, DingR . 

.

.

UPCFA Schoolmates / 1963-69

.

 Ernesto V Enrique: Familiar siya. Di naman natin kaidad? Armand Bacaltos: Kasama namin sa Available Light Movement at Ma's Concern singing group, Tats. Shell winner sa photography. Armand Bacaltos: Natatandaan siguro sya ni Boy Y. Ernesto V Enrique: Naalala ko na. Sumalangit nawa... Lilledeshan Bose: I remember reunions at his mom's house Ernesto V Enrique: I-share ko lang kay Boy. Armand Bacaltos: Di na nga nya naabutan yung awarding sa Shell. Maria Natale: I can still see you playing the piano at Vinchu's house that night. You are truly missed. Armand Bacaltos: Santy and I were spared the grief of that tragic event as we no longer proceeded to Vichu's place after coming home late from the Shell on -the-spot contest in Kawit, Cavite. Edgar Salazar: We miss him Len Francisco: Thanks for the memories, Pohl! Glenn A. Bautista: I can still hear his low voice at d upcfa restroom, close to d mirror on d left corner, "pastor, ano pakulo mo ngayon? . . . Armand Bacaltos: "Sayang talaga si Pohl, sana si Bert na lang" - Ben Navea ,,,,,"Putchat naman,e!" - Bert Alex Gaddi: Really miss those characters. I should've spent more time with you guys after college. Glenn A. Bautista: Bim, pati ba c Bert? Armand Bacaltos: Yup, RIP. Glenn A. Bautista: "namputchat naman. . . d bale, kitakits na lang sa kabila . . .

.
Pohl Soller † , Bert San Luis †
.
Ernesto V Enrique: Familiar siya. Di naman natin kaidad?
Armand Bacaltos: Kasama namin sa Available Light Movement at Ma’s Concern singing group, Tats. Shell winner sa photography.
Armand Bacaltos: Natatandaan siguro sya ni Boy Y.
Ernesto V Enrique: Naalala ko na. Sumalangit nawa…
Lilledeshan Bose: I remember reunions at his mom’s house
Ernesto V Enrique: I-share ko lang kay Boy.
Armand Bacaltos: Di na nga nya naabutan yung awarding sa Shell.
Maria Natale: I can still see you playing the piano at Vinchu’s house that night. You are truly missed.
Armand Bacaltos: Santy and I were spared the grief of that tragic event as we no longer proceeded to Vichu’s place after coming home late from the Shell on -the-spot contest in Kawit, Cavite.
Edgar Salazar: We miss him
Len Francisco: Thanks for the memories, Pohl!
Glenn A. Bautista: I can still hear his low voice at d upcfa restroom, close to d mirror on d left corner, “pastor, ano pakulo mo ngayon? . . .
Armand Bacaltos: “Sayang talaga si Pohl, sana si Bert na lang” – Ben Navea ,,,,,”Putchat naman,e!” – Bert
Alex Gaddi: Really miss those characters. I should’ve spent more time with you guys after college.
Glenn A. Bautista: Bim, pati ba c Bert?
Armand Bacaltos: Yup, RIP.
Glenn A. Bautista: “namputchat naman. . . d bale, kitakits na lang sa kabila . . .

.

271956_10150250456497732_8368304_o

.
UPCFA Schoolmates – Locker Room / 1963-69
Front: Hector Lopez, Bim Bacaltos, Ody Francisco †
Back: Glenn Bautista, Pohl Soller †, Bert San Luis† , Alex Gaddi, Ed Monariz, Bon Reyes,

.

Ernesto V Enrique: Familiar siya. Di naman natin kaidad?

Armand Bacaltos: Kasama namin sa Available Light Movement at Ma’s Concern singing group, Tats. Shell winner sa photography.

Armand Bacaltos: Natatandaan siguro sya ni Boy Y.

Ernesto V Enrique: Naalala ko na. Sumalangit nawa…

Lilledeshan Bose: I remember reunions at his mom’s house

Ernesto V Enrique: I-share ko lang kay Boy.

Yesterday at 11:23am · Like · 1

Vinchu Lapid: September 25th was our friend Teresa’s birthday. That’s why there was a party. She’s in heaven now too. RIP

Maria Natale: Si Ody din RIP na di ba?

Vinchu Lapid: Dami na Medy. Sonny too.

Maria Natale: We should really stay in touch these days! Keep the good friends near.

Glenn A. Bautista: That’s good info, Vinchu . I was in Santa Barbara, CA and when I learned – – I burned my right eyebrow while cooking (oil spilt) and hurt my right fist ‘coz I boxed the kitchen door – my landlady was so surprise . Noli went on straight with his letter about Pohl’s crossing over. Here I was in this link – -> when I re-visited my art studio and school in Santa Barbara together with some of my high school mates last May-June 2013:

.

“Excerpts on My Art”

.

Coralscape - final-sml

.
Coralscape ’84 pastel by Glenn A. Bautista

.

*

The Uncommon Art of Glenn Bautista

by Alice G. Guillermo 

.

Glenn A. Bautista: Maria, Ody slept with me for a few days when I was staying in San Francisco del Monte, QC. His small car was so heavy and I was surprise to find out what was inside . . .

Maria Natale: The Volkswagen!

Glenn A. Bautista: Maria, it didn’t look like d Volkswagen, that was Bing-bing’s, right? Perhap’s this was Sarah’s time . .

Glenn A. Bautista: Naalala ko tuloy yung kwento kay Rebillion na nakaitim at mahaba ang buhok . . wala na siguro yung “citroen” nya na may butterfly sa taas ata? Cno ba nag kwento nito?

Glenn A. Bautista: Sinong online sa facebook video chat, parang masarap mag tsismis, hehe . . ?

Cary Abeleda: It was me!! Didn’t get to see his wheels though.

Glenn A. Bautista: ah, that’ right, Cary . .

June Dalisay: Pohl, gentle and sweet, in our hearts you sleep

Rene Panlilio: yes, i remember Pohl, tahimik…

Glenn A. Bautista: Is this the June I know? . . musta na?

Glenn A. Bautista: Tahimik c Pohl pero pag tumawa, super lakas at tuluy-tuloy . .

I can still hear him laugh.

Emmanuel Garalde: Thank you Bim. Forgot about September 25. The day started with us shooting the ROTC parade in review at the sunken garden. There was so much happening and excitement. We took a lot of pictures. A guy running in the middle of the field in uniform then, taking it off and setting it on fire. Then a group of ROTC officers giving him a flying kick and beating him up. Remember, this was during the height of student activism in UP. After this event we went to Vinchu’s house. He must have been so tired. But very happy. He was joking and laughing a lot. We did not know he was sick. His heart just stopped!

Imelda Cajipe Endaya: Remember Pohl. Was it 1971, Bim? Parang earlier pa, I think we were only 17 or 18 then.

June Dalisay: Yes, Glenn, this is JUne Poticar : )

Peggy Bose: Happy birthday , Pohl. We remember you in our prayers.

Emmanuel Garalde: Yes Peggy. Let us remember and pray for Pohl, Santy, Ben, Bert, Ody, Sarah, Ed M., Sonny Barros, Tanglung Simpliciano.

Peggy Bose: And Sonia Barros and Liza Salazar. And Papu Leynes and Ed Araullo and Egay Navarro. I do enumerate them , and us too, when I pray.

Armand Bacaltos: Meps, yes it was…can’t ever forget the date. Must be ironically because Santy and I weren’t there when it happened that made it more unforgettable.

Imelda Cajipe Endaya: Lord God, thank you for the lives of those who have gone ahead of us. Eternal peace to their souls. And grant Your light and grace to us who continue to live earth’s journey.

Vinchu Lapid: Ang dami ng gone. Thanks for the list Noli and Peggy. I will be praying too. And I pray for our health specially Glenn’s and Beth Garalde’s and Ed Soriano’s.

Thelma Aranzaso Soriano: Hi Vinchu ! Hi everyone! Ed says thanks for remembering him. Yes let us pray for good health and accepting old age is a reality !!!!

Donna Lynn Abaya Caparas: Hey, that’s Uncle Babut. Thanks for sharing.

Teresa Liceralde Elloso Celdran:Yes, let’s keep praying for our friends’ who have gone ahead of us and most especially for their families and friends they have left

Teresa Liceralde Elloso Celdran: …they have left behind. Yes Pohl Soller, the boyish man behind the camera…you will always be remembered.

Melinda Soller-Abaya: To all the friends of Pohl…. Thank you for your prayers. We truly miss him.

Vinchu Lapid: Thelma, Prayers for Len’s Tata too.

Sonia Carreon: Thanks for the tag, Bim. So sorry to learn about the passing of Pohl just now. I remember him well with that colorful vest and his camera. May he rest in peace of the Lord.

Emmanuel Garalde: Glenn, Pohl’s negatives might be in your house in BF. Lots of memories in those fotos.

Len Francisco: (Vinch, thanks for remembering Tata! Praise God talaga, he’s recovering!) Diba somehow Sept 25 always reconnects us? We have that to thank Pohl for. Parang ngang it hasn’t been over 40yrs since, and looking at this photo brings back plenty of fond memories. I’m praying that by God’s grace, we will all have the next (many more) years to look forward to–joyful for every day of fresh new mercies, grateful for dear family and friends, still able to do the things we love to do kahit with 50% the energy (pati lakwatsa, and adventure like Medy), AND surviving–with a smile, even better-laughter, and the least kasungitan, worry and anxiety–everything that aging brings. Aray! Araguyguy! Arouch! Masakit lahat… (osteoarthritis) Nako saan ko ba nailapag yung salamin ko? Ay suot ko pala!! (memory lapse) Wow sarap! Crispy dinuguan, crispy pata, lechon kawali! Not!! (cholesterol) Pakagat lang please sa Krispy Kreme o J.Co doughnut na yan!!! (blood sugar)

Len Francisco: Salamat Bim for posting and tagging, at salamat rin sa mga Joaquinisms. Pampasaya ng araw, keep ’em coming!

Emmanuel Garalde :Good P.M. , nice to hear from you Manang Linda, Do you still have Pohl’s Album. I would like to copy them.

Thelma Aranzaso Soriano: Sept 25 1971 will forever be in my mind! Remembering Pohl and Teresa! We miss you !

Glenn A. Bautista: Len, sis . . may pangkontra naman sa lahat, choles & Inflamm–>krill oil, sugar–>cinnamon, osteoarthritis-ginger & dr, scholl orthotics, pain –>search “melt method”, walang gastos . . just ask dr. glenn, ok?

.

284815_10150252320367732_7798293_n

.
FlutescapeSecond Prize / UP Baguio Students’ Art Contest, Baguio City, Philippines
.
Emmanuel Garalde / Glenn A. Bautista
July 27, 2011
Emmanuel Garalde: Glenn, remember this. I took a picture of this painting with my phone. The painting is at the executive house, the residence of the U.P. president inside the Diliman Campus. The U.P. president is Fred Pascual, husband of Menchu Martinez, kasabay natin sa Fine Arts.
July 27, 2011 at 5:05am • Unlike • 1
Glenn A. Bautista: Yes, Noli. I distinctly remember this artwork. UP Pres. S.P. Lopez asked me to see him at his office (admin-where the Oblation is) and found this artwork hanging on his office wall. This was my entry for an On-the Spot art competition in Baguio that placed 2nd, I think. I think you were there too, got bored and headed home to Manila. The proud Glenn protested that this artwork should have been 1st place, hehe. Lito Carating got the 1st place. I didn’t know that then, when I protested. I had to explain that to Lito after the competition. Because of this incident, Pres SP Lopez commissioned me to do a wall mural 12 feet x 36 feet for his office (admin). There were times when the Board of Regents met with SP, and I was asked about certain issues concerning UP while I was up there on a scaffolding painting, hehe.
August 21 at 4:31pm • Edited • Like
Glenn A. Bautista: Exchanges with Meps: Imelda Cajipe Endaya: What’s the year of this painting?

.

.

Campus Crusade for Christ & UPCFA Art Students

242248_10150207853127732_3854029_o

.

259264_10150207857622732_2764054_o

.
Campus Crusade for Christ & UPCFA Art Students

– – – –

cut-outs

.
Cut-Outs 1980 / Kunstakademie / Dusseldorf, Germany

.

1980 – 1985: Glenn A. Bautista,

Art Student/Kunstakademie,

Dusseldorf, Germany

http://glennbautista.com/art/cutouts.html 

http://glennbautista.com/art/pastels.html

.

In West Germany in the mid-eighties, Glenn Bautista would do a view from his third floor window, a section of city-scape bring to the fore environments’s geometric and structural features, the principle of order in a rational and industrialized society. (AGG)

.

window1.jpg

A quality which is remarkable in this works and in all the others is that of impeccable draughtsmanship, at the same time that technical discipline is felicitously wedded with artistic insight. (AGG)

pastelpencil-phil.jpg

pastelpencil-phil2.jpg

zenscapes2.jpg

germanycomp2-smol.jpg

germanycomp1-smolfull.jpg

.

.

Future’s Past Vergangenheit der Zukunft

by Alice Guerrero Guillermo

Undoubtedly one of the most gifted artists of his generation, Glenn Bautista believes in total creativity. Wide-ranging in his production, he has distinguished himself in painting, whether in oil, pastel, or watercolor, in printmaking, particularly lithography, and in sculpture, freestanding or relief. He knew his artistic vocation from an early age — he was born in 1947 in Orion, Bataan — and he has since pursued his career with a single-mindedness of purpose.

.

.

.

Thus, he graduated with a degree of Fine Arts from the University of the Philippines in 1969, and on a scholarship grant, took further studies at Brooks Institute in Santa Barbara, California where he graduated with honors in 1971. He has recently come back from Germany where he specialized in lithography at the ‘Kunstakademie’ in Dusseldorf and experimented with new materials and processes.

Bautista’s recent shows cover his artistic production for the last three years, with most of the works done in Germany. It is significant here to note that during the time he was there, he won an ample measure of critical recognition as his works have become part of the permanent exhibit at the Galerie Art 204 at Rethelstrasse, Dusseldorf, in the company of the works of Josef Beuys, and the masters Chagall, Dali, and Miro. His one-man show at the Gallery Genesis this September attests to his prolific expression and consistent excellence and includes works in various media: paintings in pastel, mixed media works, collages, and works on handmade paper, photographs, lithographs, and cement sculpture.

.

.

*

Glenn Bautista started in the mid-Sixties as a painter of religious subjects and portraits. From the start, however, his art bore the stamp of his spontaneous originality which is the constant characteristic of his work. His early paintings of religious subjects done in the idiom of transparent cubism, more curvilinear than geometric, and which had a luminous stained-glass effect, endowed the traditional subjects with a new freshness and spiritual insight, While these early works were orthodox Christian, the religious aspect of his art acquired an increasingly eclectic character, drawing in elements and concepts from Asian religions to create a spiritual synthesis and unity of religious worship. [Inner-Light] In the Seventies, the imagery of his art moved from the religious to the surreal, as in his Inner Light Series, 1975 in oil on canvas, with titles such as Buried Time, Aquascape, Firefly, Transience, and Woodscape. It is, however, important to note that the surrealism of Glenn Bautista draws its original principle from his religious works. The sacred aura and luminous presence of his earlier works became gradually shifted to another context, this time the surrealist vision. [Pastels] How are we to define the specific character and quality of Glenn Bautista’s surrealist vision by which it distinguishes itself from the work of other surrealists? In terms of quality and feeling, it is, as we have earlier mentioned, drawn from his early religious consciousness. Thus, whether the subject be interplanetary outposts in a desert space, or trees and organic growths, it bears a spiritual presence beyond the original religious source. This abstractized religious quality is conveyed through the style itself, and, to a large extent, by the pastel medium as it is used by the artist in his individual style. In his hands, pastel assumes a rare suppleness, which, however does not preclude the clear and precise articulation of detail, the aura, spiritual or magical, is the effect of his exquisite control of light and tone. It is indeed surprising what a large tonal range can be accommodated within a small format of twelve and one fourth inches square. Often, light shines from within the forms like mysterious and beckoning Grail. It may flood valleys and gorges in a soft radiance that contrasts with the raggedness of the cliffs rising around. Light falls, like cascades, like torrents, like silent water down the slopes or the steep inclines of unknown mountains. With the light, color modulates from the purple to rose to orange with shades of gray, as the hues are brought out in all their original vividness and in their entire range of expression. Because of the intense concentration of imagery in a small format, along with the artist’s mastery of his technical means, and the flexibility and suppleness of his handling, many of the works achieve the macrocosmic dimension in their visionary scale. A small work — significantly, a square field with its equal sides — contains features on microcosm, which, in their rich and intricate interrelationships, project infinitely into a vast macrocosm, the multiple universe of endless space. The tonalities of light and dark when put into service of the linear perspective of surrealism create a trajectory into infinity, above and beyond the painting’s visual field, particularly since the artist does not mark a horizon line but telescopes, structures and crops the boundless image within the confines of the ordering square. [Abstractions] In fact, in a number of his works, Bautista has modified traditional perspective of linear convergence into more complex formulations. In some striking works, the schema of perspectival lines is elaborated into a contrapuntal network of lines that touch at points, separate and recede in an irregular zigzagging movement. The pool or subterranean depth from which a light wells out and radiates from a series of concentric layers and softly articulates the environing shapes. Another kind of perspective is off-centered and asymmetrical, as in semi-circular low-lying valley or river basin that interplays with steeply rising cliffs or a flat desert. The point of view from high Olympian vantage points is omniscient, spanning an immense temporal and spatial distance. [Heaven&Earth Oils] Thus, in these images of mystical evocation, the primitive archetypal past and the interplanetary future converge, as they reveal (and the artist has identified this as a central theme) underlying similarity of structures. The winding and tortuous mountain trails of what seems like an abandoned sky-city of Andes, Machu Picchu, perhaps, find a contemporary echo in the elaborate system of gas pipelines in a highly industrialized region, the Ruhr in Central Europe, for instance. For one, however, the images of ancient cities and ghost trails in inaccessible mountain fortresses often include the element of the organic, in the allusion to strong and ancient roots that reach down into the depths of the earth. On the other hand, the images of pipelines and what they signify of advanced industrial technology convey, in their formidable metallic structure a latent protest against dehumanization of man and decentering of his unique personality by the mammoth of mechanization. The concept of an inexorable industrial ‘‘progress’’ and the toll to the human spirit that it exacts coalesce in the powerful image of the bird’s claw with its avid and cruelly pointed talons that seem to spread out from a hard center of unrelenting steel. [Folded-Cut-Torn Pastels] In all the pastel works, however the sophisticated sense of structure the interplay of past and present and of the organic and mechanical the atmospheric space, and the quality of light blazing like a flare or softly phosphorescent-like marine forms glowing in a subterranean seas, are constant themes, of which the primary is the pervasive aura of spiritual presence the mystical, now abstracted from original context of religious orthodoxy. [Art Photos] [Insects/Photos] The same imagery as in the pastel works occurs in the photographs which are instant constructions, usually of sand and found objects, combined with sculptural forms, photographed in site. Close-up photography lends the subject of shells, rocks, and leaves, chambered nautilus, and an occasional surprise, in a rearing head of Christ, the illusion of actual existence, because of the camera’s natural function of recording material reality. It is best to relate the pastels to the photographs and vice-versa, because such comparative viewing brings out keenly the way in which a subject undergoes a shift in meaning as it is transposed into a different artistic medium. In these works, the artist is intrigued with the variation of existence of a visual sign appearing in art. In fact, the same concerns and interests which may easily grow into obsessions, also find expression in the cement relief sculptures which give the subjects another, a third, dimension of existence, this time three-dimensional with solid mass and texture. [Bas-Reliefs] In both the pastel works and the cement reliefs, the format is square, thus pointing to a real interrelationship. The textured white fields of his reliefs correspond to the desert sands of the pastel works as well as to the fine beach sand in the photographs. It becomes clear that in Glenn Bautista’s works, sand is a medium, actual or illusory, which, like water, is an essential part of this surrealist vision which both conceals, submerges or blankets like snow at the same time that it reveals and exposes mysteries of the unconscious. [Collage-Drawing] The artist rises to the conscious level and reckons reality in all its color and movement in his big collages that take off from posters and in his smaller works of mixed media that combine collage, line drawings, pastel passages and rubbings. Done in Germany, these show the contemporary First World urban environment impinging on the artist’s consciousness from all directions. The imagery of these works conveys the sophistication of cineclubs, theaters, and outdoor cafes the very structure of a well-ordered bourgeois urban milieu in the rubbings of fire hydrants, manhole covers, street signs with the immediacy of their textures, and in the vintage appeal of Chaplin posters in the context of European pop. [Cogon-Abaca Drawings] Not to be overlooked is a collection of small works on paper — particularly finely textured handmade paper from cogon and abacaproduced in Baguio studio-workshops. On these, the artist has painted with pencil and pastel European landscapes of a more familiar and reassuring scale and on-the-spot renderings of elements of the urban scene: houses, doors, windows, interiors, with particular interest in their framework and structural features. In these he has consciously brought out the textural particularities of the handmade paper to become elements of meaning in the image as a whole. At times, one senses the superimposing of two planes of existence, the European and the Philippine in the medium and the image, at other times, these two planes originating from different cultural contexts and sensibilities, remain separate and apart. [Garland Pastels] But there is always and increasingly more in the art of Glenn Bautista whose artistic creativity is multifaceted and multidirectional. His lithographs, for instance, can challenge the best in the international scene. His surrealist works are true individual reformulations of that probing vision. In his works, form and vision seem to vie with each other in their pursuit of new directions and discoveries in the vast unending field that is his artist’s terrain and which he explores in its dimensions of time and space and in its surface life and materiality as in the deep and subterranean movements and phenomena of man’s other self. About the Author: Studied at the College of the Holy Spirit and the Universite’d Aix-Marseille in France as a scholar of the French Government. She finished her Ph.D (Philippine Studies) at the University of the Philippines with the dissertation entitled “Protest/Revolutionary Art in the Marcos Regime”. She was the recipient of the Art Association of the Philippines Art Criticism Award in 1976. She also received the UP Chancellor’s Award on Best Research in 1996. In the same year she was a Research Fellow of the Japan Foundation in Tokyo. She is married to the poet Gelacio Guillermo and has two children, Sofia and Ramon. . .

My ’63 -’69 UST / UP Days

The UP Oblation / pen & ink - 92 x 193 cm /1965 by Glenn A. Bautista The UP Oblation was a pen and ink drawing that I did before I worked on the 'Complete Poems of Dr. Jose Rizal Monument'. Instead of letters or text, I made use of horizontal lines similar to the one we see on television. I improvised my own pens of different sizes by cutting the fountain pen tips to determine the width of each. I discovered that the fountain pens were a lot more effective than using the usual speedball pen tips. - glenn

.
The UP Oblation / pen & ink – 92 x 193 cm /1965 by Glenn A. Bautista
.
The UP Oblation was a pen and ink drawing that I did before I worked on the Complete Poems of Dr. Jose Rizal Monument’. Instead of letters or text, I made use of horizontal lines similar to the one we see on television. I improvised my own pens of different sizes by cutting the fountain pen tips to determine the width of each. I discovered that the fountain pens were a lot more effective than using the usual speedball pen tips. – glenn

.

Glenn drawing - Central UMCThis photo of me must have been taken in 1968, so 1968 less 1947 (my birth year) = 21. This must be a good guess ‘coz this was how I looked when I was 21. This photo must have been taken by my father, or by me using the 120 Yashica-D twin lens box camera’s self-timer. This was really my father’s camera, a camera he used while he was in the US during his studies in theology in New York.

To my left are two of my artworks: The pen & ink line drawing of the interior of the Central Methodist Church (circa 1963) based on a sketch I did, showing the left pulpit or lectern, and on its right, the box for the choir. Mrs. Daisy de Pano Parungao was our choir conductor then. Two of the pews on the foreground represent the many others behind. I used to fall asleep in these pews when the worship services were too long. The front railing with knee red cushions are for those who would either take communion, or just for a special prayer request or dedication, or for Glenn to take his first, second or even third drink of ‘grape juice’ and 3/8’ of bread, until my father whispered to my ears . . this is your last, Glenn, ok? . . . you might go past over heaven.

Having lived at the Central Church parsonage (interior- – all varnished wood) for eight years, I am quite familiar with its every ‘nook and cranny’. Below the pen and ink, is a study for a stained-glass window, having been influenced by the beautiful transparent colors of the many stained-glass windows at the Central Church interior, created by a certain craftsman, Mr. Kraut. His medium was the authentic material for stained glass work called, ‘antique glass’.

The books to my left were those of writers, Roger Fry, Herbert Read, CS Lewis and a few art brochures from art exhibits I had visited. The drawing board I was working on was handcrafted by my elder brother, I call, “Kuya Jun”, who now lives in Cerritos, California with his beautiful wife, Julie and lovely daughter, April. The ‘rattan’ table on my left is part of the parsonage’s furniture set.

.

*

A "Digi-Ana Portrait" of Kuya Jun, Ate July & April. Photo of Ate Julie and April was taken shortly before they left the Philippines for the US.

.
A Digi-Ana Portrait I recently created for Kuya Jun, Ate July & April. Photos of Ate Julie and April, Kuya Jun and Ate Julie were taken shortly before they left the Philippines for the US. They now live in Cerritos, CA.

.

*

copied sketch to oil-sml

.
This was my first oil painting copied from a small illustration about human anatomy from one of three books (below the stained-glass study) given to me by my father’s missionary friend. I will ask David to look for his name written on the three art books. These books are really a compilation of lessons from the Famous Art School instructors from the US, such as Norman Rockwell, Ben Stahl, etc. This was also the time when I won an international art competition held at the New York World’s Fair. Well, time really flies. I never realized that one day, I would be looking back to write about these photos David showed to me the last time I visited home.

.

*

OBLATION: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oblation_(University_of_the_Philippines): Several replicas of the Oblation were made for campuses of the University of the Philippines, some by National Artist Napoleon Abueva. The Oblation at the U.P. Visayas campus in Iloilo City was made by Professor Anastacio Caedo. 2005 National Artist nominee Glenn Bautista [4][5], likewise, did his celebrated version of the Oblation[5] in pen and ink as part of his schoolplates at the U.P. College of Fine Art under Professor Rebillon. The sculpture was registered at the Intellectual Property Office in the year 2004. Being the main symbol of the university, the Oblation is the centerpiece of many U.P.-related logos, like those of the Philippine Collegian and other official student publications, the U.P. Cooperative, and the U.P. Centennial emblem.

.

1967 – “Glenn’s Early Religious Works”, Abelardo Hall, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City, Philippines<br />;1968 March – “CMLI Art Scholars' Art Exhibition”, Philamlife Building, United Nations Ave., Manila, Philippines; 1968 – “Come All Ye”, Union Church of Manila, Makati, Philippines

.
1967 – “Glenn’s Early Religious Works, Abelardo Hall, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City, Philippines
1968 March – “CMLI Art Scholars’ Art Exhibition”, Philamlife Building, United Nations Ave., Manila, Philippines; 1968 – “Come All Ye”, Union Church of Manila, Makati, Philippines

.

*

379028_10150362619697732_1489399741_n

.
Glenn BautistaThird Prize, “Main Building”; Second Prize – Francis Yap; First Prize, Cesar Sario – 357th Anniversary Foundation Day On-the-Spot Painting Contest, University of Santo Tomas /1968 March

.

Glenn Bautista /1968 March – Third Prize, "Main Building" (oil); Second Prize - Francis Yap; First Prize, Cesar Sario -357th Anniversary Foundation Day On-the-spot Painting Contest, University of Santo Tomas

.
Glenn Bautista – Third Prize, “Main Building”; Second PrizeFrancis Yap; First Prize, Cesar Sario – 357th Anniversary Foundation Day On-the-Spot Painting Contest, University of Santo Tomas /1968 March

.

ust oil - reg size

.
Main Building– Third Prize, by Glenn A. Bautista
357th Anniversary Foundation Day On-the-Spot Painting Contest,
University of Santo Tomas /1968 March

*

1st prize - ust art contest

.
First Prize – awarded to UPCFA Art Student,
Glenn A. Bautista / Second UST On-the Spot Painting Contest March 7, 1969 – on the occasion of the 358th Anniversary of the University of Santo Tomas

.

.

.
First PrizeAwarded to UPCFA Art Student,
Glenn A. Bautista1968 “On-the-Spot Painting” 
XVIII National Students Art Competition / The Shell Companies in the Philippines
.
I, somehow, remember International Beauty Queen, Gemma Cruz in a photo of this Shell Students On the Spot Art Competition’s Awards Ceremony. I hope to find it one day to include in this blog. I also wish to find an image of my prize winning “on the spot painting artwork” of, “Fort Santiago”.

Gemma Cruz Araneta - retouched

.
Gemma Cruz Araneta
.
Hi Gemma, I wrote something in your FB message box. After this, I also want to ask you something about the Aguinaldo Centennial Commission in relation to a portrait of Aguinaldo I did that won 1st prize during my student days at UP. I’ve looked around for that Aguinaldo mural, but in vain. I hope you can help me find it. Take care, God bless.
.
https://glenlorndav.wordpress.com/2007/12/19/my-up-peyups-days-1964-69/

.

. 1969 March – First Prize, “Aguinaldo Portrait Mural” (oil), 11’ft x 17’ft, sponsored by the Aguinaldo Centennial Commission

.
1969 March – First Prize, “Aguinaldo Portrait Mural” (oil), 11’ft x 17’ft, sponsored by the Aguinaldo Centennial Commission

*

. Glenn w/ UPCFA mates / Available Light Movement 1971 UP CAFA locker room - at UP College of Fine Arts and Architecture

.
Glenn w/ UPCFA mates / Available Light Movement 1971
UP CAFA locker room – at UP College of Fine Arts and Architecture

.

271956_10150250456497732_8368304_o

.
UPCFA Art Student-Friends / Locker Room – Front: Hector Lopez, Bim Bacaltos; middle: Glenn Bautista, Ody Francisco; back: Pohl Soller, Bert San Luis, Alex Gaddi, Ed Monariz, Bon Reyes

.

tikoy aguiluz n bim smb

.
SMB with Beth Garalde, Tikoy Aguiluz, Bim Bacaltos and Glenn Bautista

.

. Emmanuel Garaldo: I hope this is a better photo of the exhibit at your gallery at Sining Kamalig. I am still looking for the negative. Glenn A. Bautista: Thanks Noli bro. Yes, this is a lot clearer. Pls find the negative so we can have a bigger size and resolution for this significant photo of our UPCFA mates and partners. I have fond memories of this gallery/art school. I will write about it and post a blog together with this photo. Sorry, same as UPCFA days, puro requests, hehe . . . God bless, bro.

.
Glenn’s Art Gallery/SchoolSining Kamalig, Pasay City, Philippines ca. 1975
.
Emmanuel Garalde: I hope this is a better photo of the exhibit at your gallery at Sining Kamalig. I am still looking for the negative.
Glenn A. Bautista: Thanks Noli bro. Yes, this is a lot clearer. Pls find the negative so we can have a bigger size and resolution for this significant photo of our UPCFA mates and partners. I have fond memories of this gallery/art school. I will write about it and post a blog together with this photo. Sorry, same as UPCFA days, puro requests, hehe . . . God bless, bro.

*

. Glenn A. Bautista -Emmanuel Garalde 37 minutes ago  Allowed on Timeline . Hi Noli, got to view this poster of Bim you posted just now. Couldn't resist retouching it. Not a very good job, I know . . . can you give me the link of this particular post? I couldn't find it again. — with Armand Bacaltos at San Melia - Houston.

.
One-Man Exhibit of Recent Works by Armand Bacaltos
at Sining Kamalig – opens 6 p.m., March 3 – FB postings by Glenn A. Bautista -Emmanuel Garalde
.
Hi Noli, got to view this poster of Bim you posted just now. Couldn’t resist retouching it. Not a very good job, I know . . . can you give me the link of this particular post? I couldn’t find it again. — with Armand Bacaltos at San Melia – Houston.
.
Armand Bacaltos: Nice! Pastor na, duktor pa
Armand Bacaltos: Gawin kong profile pic ha?
Glenn A. Bautista: Bim bro, may oras, araw at buwan, walang taon?
Glenn A. Bautista: Eh, Tatay kong si “Asyong” ay tunay na Pastor at Kun-duktor ng La Mallorca Pambusco sa Pampanga . . may pinagmanahan, hehe . . sa bus nya na meet ang pasahera na nanay ko, si “Enyang”.
Armand Bacaltos: Wala nang taon, kasi dinistribute mga two weeks before kaya understood na. Tinamad na rin baguhin yung layout ng script, haha. 1975 yan.

.

*

book

.
(an excerpt from: The Uncommon Art of Glenn by Alice G. Guillermo)

*

Even as a student in the College of Fine Arts of the University of the Philippines, Glenn Bautista showed extraordinary accomplishment in art. Proof of his exemplary gifts are his drawings. One of them a personal exercise he did of the Guillermo Tolentino’s Oblation, the statue in front of Quezon hall that has become symbol of academic freedom in the University, with the ordinary medium of pen and ink on paper, he executed a precise and finely modelled drawing 6/ft. by 3’ft. of the statue in three-fourths view against the setting of the administration building. This he executed in a most difficult technique which required drawing fine, perfectly even, and precisely spaced horizontal lines, with tones and shadows exactly rendered by means of closer intervals. It was a highly disciplined exercise demanding the perfect coordination of eye and hand, as well as total control in the draughtsmanly execution of the thousands of parallel lines, without the least faltering, unevenness or inaccuracy which would easily show as imperfection in the demanding work. The wonder of it was that so impeccable was the completed drawing that the technique, extraordinary yet unobtrusive, gave way to the perfect clarity and justness of the graphic image.

.

. 1967 December – First Prize, “The U.P. Entrance” (oil), First U.P. On-the-Spot Painting Contest, U.P. President’s Committee on Culture

.
1967 December – First Prize, “The U.P. Entrance” (oil), First U.P. On-the-Spot Painting Contest, U.P. President’s Committee on Culture

1. Glenn seated in front of UPCFA office, 2. 2nd prize, On the Spot Art Students Contest, Baguio City, 3. 1st Prize, UP On the Spot Art Students Contest, 4. Glenn's first copied oil painting

.
1. Glenn seated in front of UPCFA office, 2. 2nd prize, UP On the Spot Painting Contest, Baguio City, 3. 1967 December – First Prize, “The U.P. Entrance” (oil), First U.P. On-the-Spot
Painting Contest, U.P. President’s
Committee on Culture, 4. Glenn’s first copied oil painting

*

But this was not all. A companion to this remarkable work is the artist’s pen-ink drawing rendering, 6′ ft. x 3′ ft. of Jose Rizal’s Huling Paalam or Last Farewell in a line by line transcription of the entire text of Rizal’s thirty-nine poems, including the poem of the title and one song, Las Orillas del Pasig, on the space of two master illustration boards. What makes this work amazing is that the handprinted words themselves, done by means of three kinds of technical pen, light, medium and dark, build up the image Rizal’s monument at Luneta Park with all features complete and in perfect scale. A masterpiece of precision, the written text with all the letters rigorously rendered with evenness and measure concludes exactly at the bottom right hand corner of the white board. – Glenn A. Bautista – Awards and recognition:

.

1967 December – First Prize, “The U.P. Entrance” (oil), First U.P. On-the-Spot  Painting Contest, U.P. President’s  Committee on Culture

.
1967 December – First Prize, “The U.P. Entrance” (oil), First U.P. On-the-Spot
Painting Contest, U.P. President’s
Committee on Culture

.

rizalpoems.jpg

.
My internet correspondence with Wawi Navarroza, a great young artist is the reason why we have these cyberpages of my school plates at UST and UP. I had to go back to the old school plates for the readers to understand how the Rizal Pen & Ink Drawing came about. This topic got initiated upon Wawi’s invite on Dr. Jose Rizal’s latest book being launched. – glenn

.

My ‘1963-69 UST & UP Fine Arts school plates’ led to other major artworks such as the pen and ink drawing of the Jose Rizal Monument. It was composed of thirty-none (39) poems and one song “A Orillas del Pasig” of our beloved national hero, Dr. Jose Rizal himself. The song was translated into English by my late friend Alfredo Veloso. The Rizal Pen & Ink Drawing was on exhibit upon the request of Ms. Imelda Romualdez Marcos for about 6 years at the Jose Rizal Shrine at Fort Santiago. I meticulously worked on this pen & ink drawing daily for about two years. I was briefly interrupted to rest my eyes upon my father’s request. He encouraged me to tour the Philippines for a brief respite, which I did. However, I came back with a lot of drawings of my travels especially drawings I did of Sagada – – a place about 7-8 hours from Baguio. Most of the “Sagada drawings” have already been sold, but, here is a link to a few drawings that I continued to work on using the same ‘cogon-abaca papers’, hand-made by Louie Stewart, even when I was in Germany and Spain:

 http://glennbautista.com/art/cogonabacadrawings.html

Most of these drawings were initially lightly sketched using poisonous charcoal I extracted from batteries I found on the wayside. I eventually worked further on these drawings upon reaching home. I made it a point to apply fixatif protection on both sides of the drawing.

.

.

. Shellscape - 1982 / a Cogon Abaca sketch by Glenn A. Bautista http://glenn-studio.artistwebsites.com/featured/shellscape-1982-glenn-bautista.html

.
Shellscape -1982 / a Cogon Abaca sketch
by Glenn A. Bautista

.

.

santy-paper

.

.

The Complete Poems of Jose Rizal

(pen & Ink drawing) .

by UPCFA Art Student, Glenn A. Bautista

rizaldet.jpg

.
The ‘Rizal / pen & ink’ was exhibited at the Jose Rizal Shrine at Fort Santiago for six years, at the request of Madame Imelda Marcos. Eventually, I had to get the pen and ink drawing of the Jose Rizal Monument for a much-needed restoration. ~~~>:) glenn

.

centralpenink.jpg

.
Rizal / pen & ink – a take off from a school plate / UP-College of Fine Arts, Diliman, Quezon City.
The icons or images below were school plates for Technique & Reproduction and Composition classes under Professor Rebillon. The written encircled ‘1R’ meant a perfect grade and ‘R’ is the professor’s initial signature approval. These were exercises for pen and ink textures and techniques used to achieve modeling or “chiaroscuro” depicting the basic forms of various objects such as the sphere, cone, cube, pyramid and the cylinder. We were allowed to introduce new techniques such as the one I did by making use of the English alphabets or written word. This particular technique led to my major artwork, the “Jose Rizal Monument” which incorporated his (39) thirty-nine poems and one song, “A Orillas del Pasig”. The other school plates were exercises in color combination of secondary and tertiary colors. – glenn
schoolplates.jpg

*

.

rizalpoemsfull

.
The Complete Poems of Jose Rizal
(pen & Ink drawing)by UPCFA Art Student,
Glenn A. Bautista

.

.

Joya n gb sketch-sml


Thanks RodS & Dan-dan for these two images of Ninong “Peping” Joya and my quick sketch I did in his drawing class. I merely visited the UPCFA in Diliman, QC when I met Ninong “Peping” on the fourth floor and he invited me to sketch in his drawing class. He gave me a sketch pad and a charcoal pencil to participate with his students. After I sketched, he got my sketch and talked about it to the class, having a deep understanding as to what made me do a skeletal and partially flesh drawing of the nude model. He said that only if one understands the human body can one come up with such an interpretative sketch . . . Ninong “Peping” gave time to be with people to encourage them to be creative, especially with me. We miss you, Ninong “Peping”. (at University of the Philippines, Gonzales Hall, Diliman, Quezon City, Philippines)
• Glenn A. Bautista: Here’re are some comments from Dan-dan’s previous posting of my sketch with Prof. Jose Joya.
• Glenn A. Bautista: Yes, Dan-dan, I remember this sketch . . . my godfather, National artist, Jose “Peping” Joya invited me to join his drawing class when I visited the UP College of Fine Arts. I remember him telling something to his class about this sketch. Can you take a better photo using daylight w/o the glare so I can include this to my art site? How did this sketch get to your mom? Can you ask her? Now, can you guess what the drawing is about? This is a rare drawing in a rare setting. Thanks for letting me know. Meron pa bang iba? Can you take good photos for my site? I know you have a few more pastels. Just angle the framed pastels so you don’t get the glare, and background it against a dark background so as not to have a reflection or mirror image. Thanks a lot .
• Dan Bautista: I didn’t ask how she got it. I’ll try to take a better pic next time uncle. I left the house na po kasi. Just wanted to share it, i bet it gives you a lot of good memories. June 29, 2012 at 7:53pm via mobile
• Glenn A. Bautista: Hi Bitoy, tennis ka pa? Musta sa pamilya. Lungkot dto sa tate. Lapit na kaming magbakasyon. June 29, 2012 at 9:31pm
• Enrique S. Bontia: Hi Glen this is Ike Bontia, i’m here in Dallas ‘san ka sa Tx? If you are in the vicinity let’s have coffee. June 30, 2012 at 5:13pm
• Glenn A. Bautista: Hi Ike, we are 270 miles apart, medyo long drive na rin . . . call me if you can: 469-964-8328 – July 1, 2012 at 9:40pm
• Rizalinda Bautista: Hi Glenn! this sketch has been with me for a long-long time. I think i salvaged it from a heap of things for trash when we were together in BF Homes. It’s crumpled and torn on its sides but I managed to fix it a little bit. I think I also have a sketch u made of Dondon as a very little boy playing near you while you were sketching-painting. This one didn’t have your signature tho but am sure it was around late 1979 to early 1980 when you sketched it. I will ask Dandan to take a pic of it to be sent to you one of these days. -June 27 at 8:56pm –
• Alfredo Roces: Glenn, I recognize tha back of Abe Cruz and beside Baby is Tony Quintos. Both Tony and Abe have left us. God bless, – Ding.
• Alfredo Roces: keep on writing about your times Glenn.
• Glenn A. Bautista: Yes, DingR, I have been digging up images from my hard disks and photos sent in to me by David, many of which I had not seen. Just organizing these images is not an easy task. But having the present digital tools right in front of me, I should not really be complaining. Now, I seem to understand why you love to write, a skill I have totally neglected. Thanks, DingR . . 

.

Cert of Fine Arts - UP

.
Thus, Glenn graduated with a Certificate of Fine Arts from the
University of the Philippines in 1969

.

. and on a scholarship grant, took further studies at Brooks Institute in Santa Barbara, California where he graduated (BFA) with honors in 1971

.
and on a scholarship grant, took further studies at Brooks Institute in Santa Barbara, California where he graduated (BFA) with honors in 1971

.

Glenn Angeles Bautista / A CMLI Scholar – 1963-69

.

Glenn's Souvenir Program gets a dedication and signature from Senator Jose Diokno / 8th Annual National Convention of Junior Members Childrens' Museum and Library, Inc. - September 22-25, 1966 / Baguio City, Philippines

Glenn’s Souvenir Program gets a dedication and signature from Senator Jose Diokno / 8th Annual National Convention of Junior Members Childrens’ Museum and Library, Inc. – September 22-25, 1966 / Baguio City, Philippines /
.

.

. Another photo w/ Senator Jose Diokno . . this was "Free Press" times. I remember names like Climaco, Salonga, Recto, Osias, Osmena, Laurel, Manahan, etc. I used to read Leon O. Ty's political magazine, "Examiner" and those of Soc Rodrigo's. I had my Arts & Sciences and Fine Arts subjects which buildings were not too far from each other - - a good walk for an exercise in between subjects. I was enjoying two scholarships that allowed me to finish college, UP College and University, and CMLI scholarships. A third and fourth scholarships for further studies I availed of were for US and Germany.

.
Another photo w/ Senator Jose Diokno . . this was “Free Press” times. I remember names like Climaco, Salonga, Recto, Osias, Osmena, Laurel, Manahan, etc. I used to read Leon O. Ty’s political magazine, “Examiner” and those of Soc Rodrigo’s. I had my Arts & Sciences and Fine Arts subjects which buildings were not too far from each other – – a good walk for an exercise in between subjects. I was enjoying two scholarships that allowed me to finish college, UP College and University, and CMLI scholarships. A third and fourth scholarships for further studies I availed of were for US and Germany.

.

My Entry - 2nd Prize, Baguio Students' On-the-Spot Art Contest / Baguio City & CMLI Friends from Baguio City

.
 “Flutescape” – by Glenn A. Bautista / 2nd Prize, Baguio Students’ On-the-Spot Art Contest / Baguio City / Glenn with CMLI Friends from Baguio City (artwork image / Noli Garalde)

.

.

.

* GLENN’S OTHER WORDPRESS BLOGS  

*

Bloglist Titles:

.

BAUTISTA FAMILY:

Remembering Tatay & Nanay (1)   

Remembering Tatay & Nanay (2)

Remembering Tatay & Nanay4 /Photos & Videos

Celebrating the LIFE of TATAY

THANK YOU, from the Bautista Family

Tatay / Central Church & Loyola Memorial Service

.

.

ARTWORKS:

Excerpts on my ART / by Glenn Bautista

“Rizal” / pen & ink” – 1966

“EMBERS”, a mural by UPCFA art student, Glenn A. Bautista

Portraits by Glenn (1965-2002)

Digital-Analog Collage/Drawing

2009-10 Colorado Pastels by Glenn A. Bautista

.

.

PHOTOGRAPHY:

Close-up Photography by Glenn

MosquitoByte

Life’s Insectscapes & Bob Dylan

Ang Batang Pilipino by Glenn

.

.

ACTIVITIES:

Art Talk/Exhibit – Easter Sunrise Service Houston Trinity UMC

Rtn. Dir.”Glenn” meets w/ College-friend PP “Sue” again

On Cleaning / Repairing Kawai Piano, etc . . .

.

.

PUBLICATIONS:

A Foreword by My Beloved Ninong “Ernie” Salas

Glenn’s CyberArtPages 1963 – 2013 on . . 

TXSBN Press Releases 2013 / Visual Artist – Glenn A. Bautista

from glenn to glenn“ 

.

.

INTERVIEWS:

PATMOS Interviews Glenn A. Bautista / Portrait of the Artist /1976

Byron Interviews Glenn

.

.

RESEARCH:

On Filipino Tribal Tools, Weaponry, Instruments & Writings

Some Casual Thoughts behind “The Ideal Filipino Community”

The Ideal Filipino Community by Glenn Bautista

.

.

GLENLORNDAV / GALLERIES:

David & My Vintage Photos

 Interior Pix – GlenLornDav Gallery-Studio

GlenLornDav-Gallery Renov / BautistaFam Reunion-Sept ’12

Pix / BF Gallery-Studio Renovation / Sept ’12

On Cleaning / Repairing Kawai Piano, etc . . .

Out of God’s Grace

.

.

FRIENDS:

Ma’s Concern, CAFAsingers & Gentle Rain (ALM-BLM) / ’63-’69

A Letter from Gicky

Claro’s FOTOS

.

.

EDUCATION:

My ’63 -’69 UST / UP Days

My UP (Peyups) Days / 1964-69 & Kunstakademie/Guest Student / 1980-85

.

. Glenn singing w Centralites - Xmas Workcamp / Taytay, Rizal

.
Glenn singing w/ Centralites –
Christmas Workcamp / Taytay, Rizal

*

*

***

The Ideal Filipino Community by Glenn Bautista

bata.jpg
“Ang Batang Pinoy” / art-photo by Glenn A. Bautista

While Glenn Bautista has devoted his entire creative imagination to the creation of ideal spaces, he is aware that real problems exist within the physical boundaries that contain his being and that of his family. Relief from the difficult and harsh situations in which most Filipinos lives can only be achieved by a truly concerted effort that breaks down traditional community policy. This is a personal cause to which Bautista has committed himself – at the creation of a practical vision that can turn the Filipino community not into an impractical arcadia but a source of inspired well-being for every Filipino.

This comprehensive solution is proffered in the hope that adequate resources may be made available to consolidate the solution into a master plan, detailed and thoroughly researched, such that even the smallest Local Government Unit (LGU) could easily adapt it to their own particular situation. – Cid Reyes

To read the complete article, The Ideal Filipino Community/
by Glenn Bautista
and view “The Ideal Filipino Community Plans” :

 “The intuitive mind is a sacred gift and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift.” Albert Einstein

plan.jpg

 

SOWING THE SEEDS

A farmer prepares the soil before sowing the seed and nurtures a plant or a tree until it bears fruit. Likewise, the government and the private sector can help nurture the Filipino until he realized his full potential. Thus, the premises for a concept of a Filipino community have been laid down. It is comprised of linked and caring ideas focused on the Filipino, his life and domicile – an antidote to the many problems from whence sprouted our community’s major ills.

Picking up the pieces from where others failed

New communities rise and many more are coming about. Taking closer view of each of them one can see a glaring commonality. They are nothing more but a cluster of houses with access to a main road artery, and with basic utilities like water supply and electricity. Depending on its size and affluence, some have recreational facilities and a place of worship.

These communities provide shelter but nothing beyond that. Their dwellers will have to travel to their place of work, to shopping areas, to entertainment centers, etc. This inherent conceptual weakness is the reason that despite the decongestion moves pursued by the government, traffic still continues to worsen. From this spring out other related nightmares: air-pollution, waste of resources like energy and man-hours.

 

24 Upper Class Units
24 Upper Class Units

Suburban subdivisions, just like all other communities, depend solely on the government for the proper disposal of garbage. From within their own groups almost nothing is done to assure that the neighborhood is freed from unsightly, unhealthy pile of stinking rubbish. Obviously, this is one of the causes of floods, diseases and environmental pollution.

And what is more pathetic is that housing subdivisions remain unproductive pieces of important resources; land and building structures resources that otherwise would be dynamic assets contributing significantly to an economy wanting to be vibrant. But no, they only house people and nothing more. They are breeding grounds for social ills. Such a pronouncement might sound illogical until one considers the additional pressures placed on economic centers to provide gainful employment for an ever increasing workforce. Joblessness, any way you look at it, can only mean poverty and increasing crime.

Triple / Double Garden Compound
Triple / Double Garden Compound

Now that the signs of an economic take off are clearly manifesting themselves, it is paradoxical to expect further deterioration of the ordinary Filipino’s quality of life. Or is it?

 

left-behind.jpg

 

 

barung-barong.jpg

 

barung-barong-color1.jpg

Barung-Barong / by Glenn A. Bautista

oil on canvas
76.5 cm x 76.5 cm
1971
Eric Torres Collection


Some Casual Thoughts behind “The Ideal Filipino Community”


edgar-dav

by Glenn A. Bautista

“The intuitive mind is a sacred gift and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift.” — Albert Einstein

JUST ADD WATER, by Bobby Wong / www.postcardsfrommanila.com
JUST ADD WATER, by Bobby Wong / Postcards from Manila

If what I had envisioned for our country—my vision of the ideal Filipino community—had been realized, we wouldn’t be where we are now. We would be reaping all the benefits that life has to offer for every Filipino soul. This may be wishful thinking, but I believe this vision makes a lot of sense, if taken seriously… if people will listen.

Too often we attach if (or kung in Tagalog) whenever we express what for us is ideal, or our idea of progress, or our desire to reach an ideal goal. But we must take out the if and work hard and make our dream, this dream of an ideal Filipino community, a reality.

I’m convinced that this is what the good Lord wants all of us to enjoy before He comes back to show us the other world that He promised. Or is it the other world that we have yet to achieve and work hard for? Or will it be handed down to us, just like that, on a silver platter?

It all started, this idea of “the ideal community”, when I was yet a fresh graduate of the University of the Philippines. I had the chance then to visit places in northern Philippines that made me realize the importance of agriculture, fishing, etc., and their role in shaping our communities.


IMAG1912

Together with my friend, Ed Nathan Drilon, a trader and a baritone to boot, we trekked the northern trails of mountainous Cagayan Valley and a few other places until we almost reached the tip of Tumawini. This proved to be a rewarding experience for me, although, a usual one for Ed. With towels around our heads to protect us from road-dust, we cruised in an open “Volkwagen Sakbayan” from smooth to rocky roads to river banks to get to our destinations in time for the harvest of the varied crops… corn, string beans and vegetables familiar to most Filipinos. Impressed with the richness of our soil and the abundance of food source produced by our diligent farmers and fishermen, I couldn’t help but dream of doing a drawing board plan that will allow city folks to experience the same, by incorporating the agricultural aspect of rural life into the urban lifestyle. Combinations of agricultural, fish and shrimp ponds and other ventures normally done only in the provinces are enough to bring freshness and excitement into city life, within a grid-plan, I then imagined.

The initial result is a tentative plan that may be applied to minimize the present imbalance we are all experiencing now in the city centers and nearby towns. This plan is imperative for it establishes, once and for all, a balanced approach to catering to the communities’ immediate educational, commercial, agricultural, religious and cultural needs.

Perhaps this is unconsciously what guided Lorna, David and myself to somehow pursue an urban-rural type of lifestyle in Imus, Cavite. Living in the town of Imus is like having a fresh start in life. It has not been easy. But looking back after twelve years, I’m convinced the amount of time, work and patience we’ve invested in this place was worth the try. New acquaintances with farmers and other professionals and craftsmen allowed us to experience the cross-section of the Filipino society. People from all walks of life would knock on our door to offer taho (soy bean flan), or fish balls on a stick, orpan de sal (bread for breakfast) often to the accompaniment of a noisy home-made trumpet, or plastic wares and Tupperware, or cult or religion. Vendors call out our attention on a daily basis, offering goods and services of all shapes and sizes. It seems there is no limit to what they would carry on their backs just to earn a living… even furniture as heavy and bulky as beds and four season mirrors, or wash basins, brooms and house wares, or paraphernalia for services that they can perform right at your doorstep like umbrella repair, tools sharpening, shoe-shine, and many others. Folks here are hardworking, but they also seem to have all the time in the world. Just talk to a farmer who is on his way to his farm and he will stop and spend the rest of his day with you, especially if you offer him something intoxicating. I offer coffee instead, and some of Lorna’s baking experimentation for the day. Twelve years have passed, but I hardly noticed it. My son David is also about to reach the same age for he was just a baby when we got here. He gets to enjoy two worlds for we also find time on weekends to visit our other place in BF Homes where people behave differently.

I just finished taking digital photos of sketches drawn by my architect-friend, Edgar Saban, bringing into plan my basic concept of an ideal community. Of course, this is tentative, for my purpose is merely to elicit response from those who may want to pitch in ideas so that we can come up with a better concept-plan that would help bring positive changes in the community. My special thanks to a few friends for at least believing that my concept may perhaps work if given the chance and given attention by people who think less for themselves and more for others, and who are in a position to help make it happen.

vendors

This plan should carry the word ideal for the simple reason that we all must really start from the ideal. In other words, we shouldn’t make compromises in achieving the ideal goal. At the same time, it also carries the word Filipino, as this plan was conceived with the plight of struggling Filipinos in mind. But the basic concept may also be adapted to other cultural contexts in need of the same approach.

My short experience, after trying to make this concept-plan get started, tells me that this is really not an easy thing to do. This effort requires the cooperation of real-estate developers, the government, the private sectors and most especially, the landowners.

Development has its price. But communities planned idealistically can lead to better yield. People still need to see and feel some amount of freshness in life. Clean air and green surroundings. We can still do this with the large tracts of yet uncultivated land (which I had seen from a Hewey chopper). The Grid Plan can help decongest our city centers. We can live harmoniously with the rest of the Filipino people and the world. The government’s problems with the rebels will eventually cease once the rebels’ families’ needs are met. They are only fighting for the future of their children, against corruption, and to change government policies that are working against the people’s welfare. Joy and peace will never be felt in our native land until we have given direction and purpose for the smallest Filipino. I may become a successful businessman and have everything I want in this world, but if I see my neighbors miserable and hungry, would I be happy?

This concept takes into consideration the poor, the middle-class and the rich. All sectors of society will eventually benefit from the plan. If implemented successfully, there will no longer be a “poor” sector in the community.

I have prepared a “fifty to a hundred hectare grid plan”, a good size for a pilot project, showing the locations where condensed areas of virgin forest or marshlands, educational, agricultural, residential and commercial areas should be. Agricultural areas need not be a well-irrigated location, thanks to recent breakthroughs in agricultural approaches such as “hydroponics”, introduced and presently practiced in Israel and some parts of Europe. Well irrigated areas may not have any need of this, but the use of modern technologies improve quality and harvest. Traditional irrigation methods and alternative technologies may both be applied to maximize benefits. The Grid Plan, as I call it, assumes that no land will lie idle, that every spot of land in the Philippines will eventually be developed for its inhabitants, like what happened to countries like Germany and many other European and Western countries.

Realizing their mistakes, these countries had difficulty reinventing their system for they seem to have started a machine that they themselves cannot stop. In this post-cold war era, unlike these technological countries, the Philippines still has the option to shift gears and do things ideally from the start, instead of following their footsteps. The Grid Plan allows rural and urban planners to strike a balance despite future progress in business, infrastructure and real-estate development, for each module is a balanced plan that is part of the more complete and bigger plan. The Grid Plan will work because it is aimed at the fulfillment of every individual and his chosen vocation as much as it is there to enhance the goals of business. If this meaningful level is achieved in a small scale, and is eventually magnified to a global scale, humans can now dream further and start thinking about inhabiting the next possible planet instead of destroying our own.

The Grid Plan is a self-sustaining and self-sufficient system where the individual need not step on one stone after another to move forward. Instead, the system provides the individual everything he needs to directly hone his chosen craft and to fulfill his vocation. The Grid Plan is a total concept that is not really alien to most Filipinos. There may be slight adjustments from present practices, in terms of culture and traditions. But with proper guidance from the government, church-related institutions and the private sector, we can set a definite direction to strike a balance both in man’s own system and that of nature and man’s environment.

According to the plan, the workers who will build these communities will temporarily live in dormitories. They will work on weekdays but will be with their families on weekends. Eventually, the plan will allow them to become part of the community. These self-sufficient communities will not only help ease the traffic in the city centers but will complement the needs of existing business centers. These communities will further help increase production.

By now, man has realized the mistakes he has done in the past. The “fast countries” can help the “slow countries” put a stop to the mistakes they have committed in the past and redirect the “slow countries” to a better goal for the good of all.


Up to now as in the past, government efforts to ease the plight of the impoverished, especially those in squatters’ areas (now called “informal settlers”), have proven to be futile. For these efforts have failed to strike a balance in providing both shelter and livelihood sources for the communities. There is also the likelihood of more squatters coming in once news of a government housing project gets around. This cycle of events take place because of the government’s inability to see the more long-term outcome of their efforts. The present imbalance we are all experiencing now in the city centers and the nearby towns is a sign that no program in the past has really succeeded in confronting and solving this problem. The Arroyo administration’s sincerity in giving a solution to this problem is a good start, although a bit too late to have a quick solution to a big problem. We seem to have good leaders handling the housing problem, but they seem to have fallen into the same trap that those in the past have fallen into. The solution to this problem cannot come from constructing shelters for the poor within the city centers. It can only be solved if we build more communities outside the city centers, nearby towns and eventually in remote provinces to resolve the imbalances caused by poor and shortsighted design.

We must implement a balanced community plan that can satisfy the needs of the Filipino people for generations to come. A fast solution that offers shelter that the poor can repay through livelihood projects is not the answer. It is the answer for the politician’s need to get reelected when election time comes. Relocating the poor to housing projects consisting of medium-rise tenements, a policy implemented since President Marcos’ time, has never worked for the simple reason that Filipinos like to touch the earth with their hands and have their own garden where their children can play. These unoccupied tenement houses may as well be converted into business offices and offered to ambitious Filipino entrepreneurs since their original owners are already renting them out for an attractive fee; and they are back to ‘squatting’ in areas where they see a better chance of eking out a living. We need not go vertical yet in the old cities. We must go horizontal—from the tip of Jolo to the tip of Tumawini.

A MODERN HARVEST, by Bobby Wong / www.postcardsfrommanila.com
A MODERN HARVEST, by Bobby Wong / Postcards from Manila

Only after we’ve achieved this can we cautiously go vertical in pre-located places. Most, not all, squatter-occupied areas must not be allowed to grow. If the landowners of squatter-occupied areas are willing to work out a program with the government or real-estate developers or with the private sector or other agencies or countries, then a well-balanced community plan could be effected. However, if the landowners are unwilling to undertake any program, the government must help evict these squatters in favor of the landowners for the land to be used more properly for a better community-oriented project. The scanty government funds available for housing must be spent wisely on long-range community plans and their immediate implementation with the help of the private sector, other countries and international organizations willing to initially help “slow countries” make the first proper step in building well-planned and balanced communities. A more immediate plan must take effect that would lure squatter communities back to their respective provinces by building more of these well-balanced communities where they can really belong and thus contribute to the decongestion of cities. Fresh and talented graduates of universities must go back to their places of origin and apply their honed skills in building their own versions of the ideal community for their own town mates and relatives. The present influx of rural folk to the cities will then be reversed if these programs are properly implemented and a more meaningful balance is achieved.

When planning for a community, the total fulfillment and wellbeing of the smallest Filipino must be first in the architect’s mind, intent and passion. Lack of funds to build such communities is not the obstacle. The real obstacle is the lack of practical vision, focus and direction. Once given the chance to materialize, the Grid Plan will allow us to take the first step in building the first ideal Filipino community.


These communities can get infectious when interpreted and incorporated into the varied and colorful customs and traditions of multi-talented Filipinos. The inexhaustible natural talents and skills of Filipinos (e.g., long list of patent pending inventions of Filipinos taken advantage of by other countries) will have an effective channel once a pilot community such as I have envisioned is effected. The Grid Planis the missing link that has not been given any chance. Let’s give it a try and pray that the good Lord will continue to give us the strength and the guidance to build this ideal Filipino community, which is really just a small version of the ideal community he envisions for us all.

The Ideal Filipino Community


.

.

.

by

Glenn Bautista

FROM POETICS TO PRACTICALITIES
(an introdu
ction by Cid Reyes)

While Glenn Bautista has devoted his entire creative imagination to the creation of ideal spaces, he is aware that real problems exist within the physical boundaries that contain his being and that of his family. Relief from the difficult and harsh situations in which most Filipinos’ lives can only be achieved by a truly concerted effort that breaks down traditional community policy. This is a personal cause to which Bautista has committed himself – at the creation of a practical vision that can turn the Filipino community not into an impractical arcadia but a source of inspired well-being for every Filipino. This comprehensive solution is proffered in the hope that adequate resources may be made available to consolidate the solution into a master plan, detailed and thoroughly researched, such that even the smallest Local Government Unit (LGU) could easily adapt it to their own particular situation.

Stories behind the Article

“The Ideal
Filipino
Community”

by Glenn A. Bautista


If, or “kung” in Tagalog is a requisite to or almost synonymous with the words ideal or progress that indicates reaching an ideal goal. If what I write or dream about for our country and people happens, or had been achieved a long time ago, we wouldn’t be where we are now. We would be enjoying what the good life really offers for every Filipino soul. This may be wishful thinking, but I believe can make a lot of sense if taken seriously. We can still work hard and take out the if and make what I’m writing about a reality. I’m convinced that this is what the good Lord wants to happen for all of us to enjoy before He comes back to show us the other world that He promised. Or is the other world what we have yet to achieve and work hard for, or, will it be handed down to us, just like that, on a silver platter?

It all started, “this ideal community thing”, when I was yet a fresh graduate from the University of the Philippines. Then, I had the chance to visit some of the places in northern Philippines that made me realize the importance of agriculture, fishing, etc., and their role in shaping our communities. Together with my friend, Ed Nathan Drilon, a trader and a baritone to boot, we trekked the northern trails of mountainous Cagayan Valley and a series of places almost reaching the tip of Tumawini. This proved to be a rewarding experience for me, although a usual one for Ed. With towels around our heads to protect us from road-dust, we went on a cruise with an open “Volkwagen Sakbayan “ from smooth to rocky roads to river banks, just to get to our destinations in time for the harvest of the varied crops. . . corn, string beans and vegetables familiar to most Filipinos. Impressed with the richness of our soil and the abundance of food source produced by our diligent farmers and fishermen, I couldn’t help but dream of doing a drawing board plan, that will allow city folks to experience the same, by incorporating the agricultural aspect of rural life into the urban lifestyle. Combinations of agricultural, fish and shrimp ponds and other ventures normally done only in the provinces are enough to bring freshness and excitement into city life, within a grid-plan, I then imagined. The initial result is a tentative plan that may now be applied to minimize the present imbalance we are all now experiencing in the city centers and nearby towns.This plan and its application is necessary for it sets aside, once and for all, a balanced approach in catering to the communities’ immediate educational, commercial, agricultural, religious and cultural needs. (click -> full article)